Do You Know Your State Payroll Laws - Alabama to Missouri

Do You Know Your State’s Payroll Rules? Part 1: Alabama  – Missouri

Disclaimer: I am not an attorney. If you have any questions about federal or state payroll laws, please contact an HR professional and/or Employment Attorney.

Following payroll laws requires more than just making sure your employees are paid on time. Each state has their own payroll laws, including:

Keep reading to find out what your state’s payroll laws are.


I won’t make you scroll through this whole thing. Just click on your state below! 
| Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California |
| Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia |p
| Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa |
| Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland |
| Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri |
Don’t see your state? Go to Part 2: Montana – Wyoming


Alabama

Frequency & Manner of Payment

Alabama does not have any laws dictating how often to pay your employees, or in what manner to pay them.

Payment Upon Separation

Alabama does not have any laws about when you must pay an employee after they have left your company.

Deductions

Alabama does not have any laws about what can and cannot be deducted from an employee’s paycheck.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Alabama does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Alabama does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

In Alabama, you can reduce an employee’s wages at any time, unless you have an employment agreement or contract that prohibits you from reducing their wages.

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction, but you can only apply the reduced rate to hours worked after the decision to reduce wages has been made.

Paystubs

Alabama does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

Alabama does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

Alabama does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Alaska

Frequency & Manner of Payment

You must pay your employees semimonthly or monthly.

You can pay your employees by cash or check. You can also pay them via direct deposit, with their consent.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay the employee all their wages within three (3) working days.

If you lay off an employee temporarily, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

With written consent, you may deduct the following from an employee’s paycheck:

  • money to pay a creditor or other third party;
  • reimbursement for transportation from the place of hire to the place of employment;
  • room and board, if you normally provide it and it’s used voluntarily by the employee; and
  • a security deposit to ensure the employee returns uniforms or other equipment.

You cannot deduct:

  • cash shortages,
  • damaged or lost property,
  • the cost of uniforms or other necessary equipment,
  • dishonored or bad checks, or
  • anything similar.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

If the uniform or equipment is required by federal, state, or local health and safety codes, then you cannot require an employee to purchase it.

You also cannot require an employee to purchase uniforms or equipment if the nature of your business requires their use, and if

  • the uniform or equipment is distinctive and advertises your products or services (unless you also sell the clothing to the public), or
  • the uniform cannot be worn or used during normal social activities.

You can, however, require the employee to pay a security deposit on any uniform or equipment.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Alaska does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire medical, physical, or drug tests.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must inform an employee of any changes to their wages or to the day and place of their payment. You must inform them no later than the payday before the change.

Paystubs

Each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub. The paystub must include:

  • rate of pay,
  • gross wages,
  • net wages,
  • beginning and ending dates of the pay period,
  • federal income tax withheld,
  • FICA deductions,
  • Alaska Employment Security Act contributions,
  • room and board costs,
  • any advances,
  • straight-time and overtime hours worked in the pay period, and
  • any other authorized deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following information for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • rate of pay and amount paid each pay period;
  • hours worked each day and each workweek; and
  • any other relevant payroll information.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must tell them (in writing) the day and place of payment and their wage rate.

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Arizona

Frequency of Payments

You must designate at least two (2) days each month as fixed paydays. These days cannot be more than 16 days apart.

For regular time worked, you must pay employees within five (5) days of the end of each pay period. If the employee worked overtime or is entitled to exception pay, you must pay them overtime and exception pay within 16 days of the end of the pay period.

If you’re paying your employees by cash or check and your payroll system is centralized outside of Arizona, you must pay your employees within 10 days of the end of the pay period.

If your main location is outside of Arizona and your payroll system is centralized outside of Arizona, then you may pay FLSA-exempt employees monthly.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If an employee has consented (in writing), then you may pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them within seven (7) days or by the next regular payday, whichever is sooner.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), then you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You may only withhold or deduct amounts from an employee’s paycheck if

  • you are required or empowered to do so by state or federal law,
  • the employee has consented in writing, or
  • there is a reasonable good faith dispute to the amount of wages due.

You may deduct the following with written consent from the employee:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of property; and
  • dishonored or returned checks.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Arizona does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Arizona does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire medical, physical, or drug tests.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about a wage reduction.

Paystubs

You are only required to give an employee a paystub each pay period if you pay them via direct deposit.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following information for at least four (4) years:

  • hours worked each day and
  • wages paid each pay period.

Notices

Arizona does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Arkansas

Frequency of Payments

If you do business in Arkansas, you must pay your employees semi-monthly.

You may pay your FLSA-exempt management-level and executive employees monthly if

  • you have an annual gross income of $500,000 or more, and
  • the employee makes more than $25,000 a year.

Manner of Payments

You can pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

If you pay an employee by check from an account with insufficient funds, the employee can insist that future wages be paid in cash.

An employee can opt out of direct deposit through a written statement requesting payment by check.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reasons you must pay them all wages due by the next regular payday. If the employee requests or demands payment, then you must pay them all wages due within seven (7) day of the discharge.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), then you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

Arkansas does not have any laws about what can and cannot be deducted from an employee’s paycheck.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Arkansas does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Arkansas does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire medical, physical, or drug tests.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Arkansas does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following information for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • rate of pay,
  • amount paid each pay period, and
  • other related payroll information.

Notices

Arkansas does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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California

Frequency of Payments

You must pay employees at least twice per month on days designated in advance as regular paydays.

If you pay your employees semimonthly, then any wages earned between the 1st and the 15th of the month must be paid by the 26th of the month. Any wages earned between the 16th and the last day of the month must be paid by the 10th of the following month.

If you do not pay your employees semimonthly, then wages must be paid within seven (7) calendar days after the end of the pay period.

If an employee is entitled to overtime pay, then you must pay their overtime pay no later than the payday for the next regular pay period. In other words, if you pay your employees semimonthly and an employee earns overtime between the 1st and 15th, then you must pay them overtime pay by the 10th of the following month with their regular pay that was earned between the 16th and the last day of the month.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them at the time of termination.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily and gives at least 72-hours notice, then you must pay them at the time of departure.

If an employee quits or resigns and does not give at least 72-hours notice, then you must pay them within 72 hours.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), then you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If you lay off an employee because it’s the end of their seasonal employment in curing, canning, or drying of perishable fruit, fish, or vegetables, then you must pay them within 72 hours.

If the employee is laid off from an oil-related business, then you must pay them within 24 hours (excluding weekends and holidays).

Deductions

You may only deduct or withhold amounts from an employee’s paycheck if

  • you’re required or empowered to do so by state or federal law;
  • the deduction is expressly authorized, in writing, by the employee to cover
    • insurance premiums,
    • benefit plan contributions, or
    • other deductions not amounting to a rebate on wages; or
  • the deduction is to cover health, welfare, or pension contributions, which are expressly authorized by a collective bargaining agreement.

You cannot deduct the following:

  • any portion of gratuities;
  • the cost of any photograph of the applicant or employee, if you require the photograph;
  • the cost of a bond, which you require of an applicant or employee;
  • the cost of a required uniform, unless the employee has given written consent to have the cost deducted (if the uniform is not returned to the employer);
  • the cost of any required tools or equipment, unless the employee earns at least twice the minimum wage; and
  • any expenses or losses incurred because of the discharge of an employee’s work duties.

You may deduct cash shortages, breakage or loss of property, and dishonored checks if it can be shown that the issue was caused by

  • a dishonest or willful act, or
  • the gross negligence of the employee.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You cannot require an employee to purchase required uniforms or equipment.

However, you can require an employee to purchase hand tools and other equipment customarily used in their industry, if they earn at least twice the minimum wage.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about a wage reduction.

Paystubs

You must supply each employee with a paystub each payday. The paystub must include:

  • gross wages earned;
  • hourly rates and the number of hours worked at each rate;
  • total hours worked, except for an employee whose pay is entirely based on salary and is exempt from overtime pay;
  • number of piece-rate units earned, if the employee is paid on a piece-rate basis;
  • all deductions;
  • net wages earned;
  • beginning and ending dates of the pay period;
  • name of employee and at least the last four (4) digits of their social security number; and
  • name and address of the employer.

Recordkeeping

You must keep payroll-related records for at least three (3) years.

Notices

You must post (and keep posted) in a conspicuous place a notice specifying the regular paydays and time and place of payment.

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Colorado

Frequency & Manner of Payments

You must pay employees at least once a month. Payday must be within 10 days after the end of the pay period in which the wages were earned.

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If an employee agrees to it, you may pay them via direct deposit. If an employee has access to full wages due at least once per pay period and the employee can choose an alternative method of payment, then you can pay an employee via payroll card.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay the employee immediately or within six (6) hours after the start of the accounting department’s next regular workday. If the accounting department is located off site, however, then you must pay the employee within 24 hours after the start of the accounting department’s next regular workday.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, then you must pay the employee by the next regular payday.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), then you must pay the employee by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You may only withhold or deduct amounts from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required by local, state, or federal law;
  • the deduction is for loans, advances, goods or services, or equipment and property provided through a written agreement;
  • necessary to cover the replacement of a shortage due to theft by an employee, if a report has been filed with law enforcement;
  • any deduction not specifically prohibited that is authorized by the employee; or
  • deduction is for the amount of money or value of property that the employee failed to pay or return upon separation from the company.

You cannot deduct the following:

  • cash shortages,
  • damaged or lost property,
  • cost of uniforms or necessary equipment,
  • dishonored or bad checks, or
  • any similar deductions.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost, maintenance, or cleaning of uniforms or special apparel. However, you may require a security deposit (up to half the actual cost) to ensure the uniform is returned. The cost of reasonable wear and tear cannot be deducted from the employee’s wages or their security deposit.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an applicant to pay for the cost of any pre-hire examinations or the cost of any records required as a condition of employment, unless the records support the applicant’s statement in their application

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about a wage reduction.

Paystubs

You must give each employee a paystub on each payday. It must be in writing and must include:

  • gross wages earned,
  • all withholdings and deductions,
  • net wages earned,
  • beginning and ending dates of the pay period,
  • employee’s name or social security number, and
  • name and address of employer.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following information for at least two (2) years:

  • name, address, social security number, occupation, and date of hire;
  • date of birth (if under 18);
  • hours worked each day;
  • record of allowable credits and declared tips; and
  • regular rates of pay, gross wages earned, withholdings, and net wages paid each pay period.

Notices

You must post and keep posted conspicuously a notice specifying regular paydays and the time and place of payment, as well as any changes.

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Connecticut

Frequency & Manner of Payments

You must pay employees weekly and must have designated paydays.

Payday can never be more than eight (8) days after the end of the pay period. If payday falls on a nonwork day, wages must be paid on the preceding workday.

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If you have written consent, you can pay your employees via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay the employee by the end of the next business day.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), then you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You may only withhold amounts if

  • required or empowered to do so by state or federal law;
  • you have written authorization from an employee on a form approved by the Connecticut Department of Labor (DOL);
  • the deductions are authorized, in writing, by the employee for medical, surgical, or hospital care or service, without financial benefit to the employer and recorded in the employer’s wage record book; or
  • the deduction is a contribution to an automatic enrollment retirement plan (like a 401(k), 403(b), 408, 408A, or 457) established by the employer.

You can only deduct the following with written authorization from the employee on a form approved by the Connecticut DOL:

  • cash shortages,
  • damaged or lost property,
  • the cost of uniforms or necessary equipment,
  • dishonored or bad checks, or
  • any similar deductions.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Connecticut does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Connecticut does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must inform employees in writing or through a posted notice (maintained in a place accessible to all employees) of any changes to wages, vacation pay, sick leave, health and welfare benefits, practices and policies, and any comparable matters.

Paystubs

Connecticut does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • hours worked and
  • wages paid.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must inform them, in writing, of their rate of pay, hours of employment, and wage payment schedules.

You must inform employees in writing or through a posted notice (maintained in a place accessible to all employees) of any changes to wages, vacation pay, sick leave, health and welfare benefits, practices and policies, and any comparable matters.

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Delaware

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least monthly on regularly scheduled paydays.

You must pay all wages within seven (7) days after the end of the pay period. If the regular payday falls on a nonwork day, you must pay your employees on the preceding workday.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If you have written consent from the employee, you may pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves the company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may only deduct or withhold amounts from any employee’s paycheck if

  • required or empowered to do so by state or federal law;
  • deductions are for medical, surgical, or hospital care or service, without financial benefits to the employer and are recorded in the employers’ record book; or
  • you have signed authorization for deductions for a lawful purpose to the benefit of the employee.

You cannot deduct the following:

  • cash shortages;
  • damaged or lost property;
  • uniforms, tools, or other necessary equipment;
  • dishonored or bad checks; or
  • any similar deduction.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Delaware does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job. However, you cannot deduct the costs from an employee’s wages, and you cannot deduct the cost of unreturned items from an employee’s final paycheck.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Delaware does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you have more than three (3) employees, then you must notify an employee in writing or through posted notice (prior to the changes) of any reduction in their regular rate of pay or of any change to the day, hour, and place of payment.

Paystubs

If you have more than three (3) employees, you must give them a paystub with each paycheck. The paystub must include:

  • wages due,
  • the pay period for which the wages are due,
  • each deduction and the amount, and
  • total number of hours worked for hourly employees.

The paystubs may be provided on the check, as a separate slip, or electronically (if it’s in a form capable of being retained by the employee).

Recordkeeping

If you have more than three (3) employees, you must keep all wage and hour records for at least three (3) years.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must provide, in writing, their rate of pay and day, hour, and place of payment.

You must notify an employee in writing or through posted notice (prior to the changes) of any reduction in their regular rate of pay or of any change to the day, hour, and place of payment.

You also must make available, in writing or through a posted notice, any employment practices and policies in regard to

  • vacation pay,
  • sick leave, and
  • any comparable matters.

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Florida

Frequency & Manner of Payments

Florida does not have any laws dictating how often to pay your employees.

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If you have written consent, you can pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

Florida does not have any laws about when you have to pay an employee after they have left your company.

Deductions

Florida does not have any laws about what can and cannot be deducted from an employee’s paycheck.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

If you are a labor pool employer, you cannot charge day laborers for any safety equipment, clothing, or other required items.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Florida does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

If you are a labor pool employer, you must provide day laborers with a written, itemized statement showing each deduction made from wages.

Recordkeeping

Florida does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

Florida does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Georgia

Frequency of Payments

You must have regularly scheduled paydays, which must be divided between at least two (2) equal pay periods each month.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. You may pay your employees via direct deposit, with consent.

Payment Upon Separation

Georgia does not have any laws about when you have to pay an employee after they have left your company.

Deductions

Georgia does not have any laws about what can and cannot be deducted from an employee’s paycheck.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Georgia does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Georgia does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Georgia does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must maintain records of

  • the hours worked and
  • wages paid.

Notices

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must complete Georgia DOL-800 and provide a copy to the employee on their last day of work.

If there are mass layoffs or other mass separations, you must complete Georgia DOL-402 and DOL-402A.

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Hawaii

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees twice per month on regular paydays, designated in advance. You must pay your employees within seven (7) days of the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. Hawaii has no law indicating whether you can pay your employees via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, then you must pay them at the time of discharge.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily and gives one-day notice (or less), then you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily and gives you more than one-day notice, then you must pay them at the time of their quitting.

If the employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), then you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You may only withhold amounts from an employee’s paycheck

  • when authorized by federal or state law, or
  • with written consent.

You cannot deduct the following:

  • fines;
  • cash shortages from a money till, cash box, or register used by two (2) or more people;
  • cash shortages from a money till, cash box, or register used by a single employee, if that employee is not given the opportunity to account for all money received at the start of their shift and all money turned in at the end of their shift;
  • cost for breakage;
  • bad or dishonored checks; or
  • medical or physical examination or medical report expenses required by the employer or by law.

If the losses are not due to the employee’s willful or intentional disregard, then you cannot deduct the following:

  • losses due to faulty workmanship;
  • lost or stolen property;
  • damage to property;
  • default of a customer’s credit; or
  • nonpayment for goods or services received by customers.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Hawaii does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an applicant to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify the employee, in writing or by posting a notice, of any changes to their rate of pay or the day, hour, and/or place of payment.

Paystubs

You must provide a legible printed, typewritten, or handwritten paystub to each employee on every payday. With written consent, the paystub may be sent electronically. It must include:

  • total hours worked,
  • overtime hours worked,
  • straight-time compensation,
  • overtime compensation,
  • other compensation,
  • total gross compensation,
  • amount and purpose of each deduction,
  • total net compensation, and
  • the dates of the pay period.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least six (6) years:

  • full name, social security number, or identifying number or symbol (used in place of or in addition to name on record);
  • home address;
  • date of birth (if under 19);
  • occupation;
  • rate of pay and length of pay period;
  • hours worked each workday;
  • total hours worked each workweek;
  • total daily or weekly straight-time wages;
  • total weekly overtime wages;
  • amount and purpose of additions to or deductions from wages paid each pay period;
  • total wages paid each pay period and the dates of each pay period;
  • date of hire; and
  • date of termination.

Notices

You must notify each new employee, in writing, of their rate of pay and the day, hour, and place of payment.

You must notify each employee, in writing or by posted notice, of policies regarding vacation and/or sick leave.

You must notify employees, in writing or by posting a notice, of any changes to their rate of pay or the day, hour, and/or place of payment.

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Idaho

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least once per month, and payday cannot be more than 15 days after the end of the pay period.

If your regular payday lands on a nonwork day and the next workday is more than 15 days after the end of the pay period, you must pay your employees on the workday preceding the normal payday.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. You may pay them via direct deposit, with consent.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them on the earlier of

  • the next regularly scheduled payday, or
  • within 10 days of separation, not including weekends or holidays.

If the employee submits a written request for payment, then you must pay them within 48 hours of receiving the request.

Deductions

You may only withhold or deduct an amount from an employee’s paycheck if required by law or with the employee’s written consent.

With written consent, you may deduct the following:

  • cash shortages,
  • damage or lost property,
  • the cost of uniforms or necessary equipment,
  • dishonored or bad checks, or
  • similar deductions.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Idaho does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Idaho does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you’re reducing an employee’s wage rate, you must give them notice before they perform any worked at the reduced rate. The employee may request the notice to be in writing.

Paystubs

For each pay period, you must provide each employee with a statement of their deductions.

Recordkeeping

You must keep payroll-related records for at least three (3) years.

Notices

When you hire a new employee, you must inform them of their rate of pay and when each payday is. Your new employees may request this notice to be in writing.

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Illinois

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least twice per month.

If you pay your employees twice per month, you must pay them within 13 days after the end of the pay period.

If you pay your employees weekly, you must pay them within seven (7) days after the end of the pay period.

If you pay your employees daily, you must pay them the same day the wages are earned (as possible) or within 24 hours.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You cannot withhold any amount from an employee’s wages, unless it is

  • required by law;
  • for the employee’s benefit;
  • in response to a garnishment, wage assignment, or wage deduction order; or
  • with the employee’s written consent.

You may only deduct the following with the employee’s written consent:

  • cash shortages;
  • inventory shortages;
  • failure to follow proper credit card, check cashing or accounts receivable procedures;
  • damaged property;
  • required uniforms;
  • necessary equipment; or
  • deposits on loaned equipment or other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You may require an employee to pay for a required uniform or necessary equipment. However, you can only deduct the cost from the employee’s paycheck if you have their written consent.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify your employees of any changes to their wage rate or to the time and place of payment prior to making the changes.

Paystubs

You must give each employee an itemized statement of deductions for each pay period.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name and address,
  • hours worked each day,
  • rate of pay,
  • amount paid for each pay period,
  • deductions made from each paycheck,
  • the number of vacation days earned each year, and
  • the dates vacation days were taken and paid.

Notices

When you hire a new employee, you must notify them of their rate of pay and the time and place of payment. When possible, the notice must be in writing and acknowledged by both you and the employee.

You must notify your employees of any changes to their wage rate or to the time and place of payment prior to making the changes.

You must post, in a position easily accessible to all employees, notices indicating the regular paydays and the place and time for payment.

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Indiana

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your hourly employees at least twice per month. You must pay all your employees within 10 days of the end of their pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

If the employee can choose the financial institution with which the wages are deposited, you can require the employee to receive their paychecks via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay the employee by the next regular payday.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay the employee by the next regular payday.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily and you do not have their address, then you must pay them

  • within 10 business days after the employee has demanded their paycheck, or
  • when you learn where the paycheck can be sent or forwarded.

If the employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay the employee by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You can deduct amounts from an employee’s paycheck if

  • the employee consents in writing,
  • the employee personally signs the written consent form,
  • the employee can revoke consent at any time with written notice, and
  • you agree to it in writing.

The employee must give you a copy of their consent within 10 days of the deduction’s implementation.

An employee can only give written consent to the following deductions:

  • premiums on an insurance policy;
  • contributions to a charitable organization;
  • purchase price of bonds, securities or stock of your company;
  • labor union dues;
  • purchase price of merchandise sold by you to them;
  • payments on a loan made to the employee by you;
  • contributions to a hospital service or medical expense plan; and
  • payment to the employee’s direct deposit account.

If you overpaid an employee, you may deduct the overpayment from the employee’s paycheck. However, you must give the employee two (2) weeks’ notice before deducting the overpayment.

You cannot deduct the following from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • required uniforms;
  • required tools; or
  • other necessary items.

You cannot deduct amounts from an employee’s paycheck that are more than

  • 25% of the employee’s disposable earnings for that week, or
  • the amount by which the employee’s disposable earnings for the week exceed 30 times the federal minimum wage rate.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Indiana does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job. However, you cannot deduct the cost from their paycheck.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Indiana does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

For each employee, you must provide a paystub for each pay period. The paystub must include:

  • hours worked,
  • wages paid, and
  • deductions made.

Recordkeeping

Indiana does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

Indiana does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Iowa

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least monthly, semimonthly, or biweekly on regularly spaced paydays.

You must pay your employees within 12 days (excluding Sundays and holidays) after the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. With the employee’s written consent, you may pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You may only make deductions from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required or permitted to do so by state or federal law,
  • required to do so by order of a court of competent jurisdiction, or
  • the employee has given their written consent.

You cannot deduct or withhold the following from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages in a common money till, cash box, or register operated by two (2) or more employees;
  • any losses due to a dishonored check, if the employee has been given discretion to accept or reject checks and the employee does not abuse that discretion;
  • any losses due to breakage, damage to property, default of customer credit, or nonpayment for goods or services rendered, if the losses are not due to the employee’s willful or intentional disregard;
  • lost or stolen property, unless the property is equipment specifically assigned to the employee and the employee acknowledged receiving the equipment in writing;
  • gratuities received from customers;
  • costs of personal, required protective equipment, unless provided in a collective bargaining agreement; or
  • costs of more than $20 for an employee’s return to the place of employment.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You may require an employee to purchase a uniform, tools, or other necessary equipment.

If the uniform has a logo or company colors that makes the uniform unusable outside of work, you cannot deduct the cost from the employee’s wages.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Iowa does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you have previously violated wage payment laws, Iowa may require you to notify employees of any changes to wages or paydays, at least one pay period prior to the changes. The notice must be in writing or posted.

Paystubs

You must provide each employee with a paystub on each payday. The paystub must include the following:

  • hours worked,
  • wages earned, and
  • any deductions made.

The paystub may be electronic, if you give your employees free and unrestricted access to a printer to print the paystub.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • full name;
  • the employee’s identifying symbol or number, if used in place of name on any time, work, or payroll records;
  • home address;
  • date of birth (if under 19);
  • time of day and day of week on which the employee’s workweek begins;
  • basis of pay (indicating whether the amount paid is per hour, per day, per week, per piece, per commission on sales, etc.);
  • hours worked each workday and total hours worked each workweek;
  • total daily or weekly straight-time wages;
  • total additions to or deductions from wages paid each pay period;
  • dates, amounts, and nature of each addition and deduction;
  • total wages paid each pay period; and
  • date of payment and the dates covered by each pay period.

You must also keep the following records for at least two (2) years:

  • basic employment and earnings records, including:
    • all basic time and earning cards or sheets, which indicate the starting and stopping time of individual employees or of separate workforces; and/or
    • the amount of work accomplished by individual employees, when those amounts determine the pay-period earnings of those employees; and
  • wage rate tables, including all tables or schedules which provide the piece rates or other rates used in computing straight-time earnings, wages, or salary, or overtime pay.

Notices

If you have previously violated wage payment laws, Iowa may require you to:

  • notify your employees, in writing at the time of hire, what wages and regular paydays are;
  • notify your employees at least one pay period prior to the beginning of any changes to wages or paydays; and
  • to make available to your employees upon written request, a written statement of employment agreements and policies regarding
    • vacation pay,
    • sick leave,
    • reimbursement of expenses,
    • retirement benefits,
    • severance pay, or
    • other comparable matters concerning wages.

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Kansas

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least once per month on regular paydays.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

You may pay your employees by payroll card, if the employees can make at least one withdrawal per pay period at no cost to them for an amount up to their net wages. You may not charge initiation, loading, or other participation fees, except the cost required to replace a lost, stolen, or damaged card.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You may only make deductions from any employee’s paycheck if

  • required or empowered to do so by state or federal law;
  • the deductions are for medical, surgical, or hospital care or service, without financial benefit to the employer and are recorded in the employer’s books;
  • the employee has given written consent to the deductions; or
  • the deductions are for contributions to an automatic enrollment in a retirement plan (like a 401(k), 403(b), 408, 408A, or 457) established by the employer.

You cannot deduct the following:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • required uniforms;
  • required tools; or
  • other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Kansas does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Kansas does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify your employees, in writing or through a posted notice, of any changes to wage rates, day of payment, or place of payment before the change.

Paystubs

For each pay period, you must give each employee a paystub itemizing the deductions made.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name,
  • occupation,
  • rate of pay,
  • amount paid each pay period, and
  • hours worked each day and each workweek.

Notices

If an employee requests it, you must notify them (in writing, through posted notice, or as required by a collective bargaining agreement) of

  • their rate of pay and of the day and place of payment;
  • any changes to wage rates, day of payment, or place of payment;
  • employment practices and policies regarding
    • vacation pay,
    • sick leave, and
    • any other benefits to which the employee is entitled and which have a direct impact on their wages payable.

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Kentucky

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least twice per month. You must pay them within 18 days after the end of the pay period.

If an employee is absent on payday or otherwise not paid on payday, you must pay them within six (6) days of the employee’s demand for their paycheck.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regular payday or within 14 days of separation, whichever comes later.

Deductions

You can only make deductions from an employee’s paycheck if

  • authorized to do so by local, state, or federal law; or
  • the employee has consented in writing to the deduction to cover
    • insurance premiums,
    • hospital or medical dues, or
    • other deductions not specifically forbidden.

You cannot withhold or deduct the following from an employee’s paycheck:

  • fines;
  • cash shortages in a common money till, cash box, or register used by two (2) or more people;
  • breakage;
  • losses due to defective or faulty workmanship;
  • lost or stolen property;
  • damage to property;
  • default of customer credit or nonpayment for goods or services, if the losses are not due to the employee’s intentional or willful disregard of the employer’s interest;
  • uniforms;
  • tools, or
  • other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Kentucky does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

If you have 10 or more employees, you must give them a paystub on each payday. The paystub must include the amount and general purpose of each deduction.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following information for at least one (1) year:

  • full name and identifying symbol or number, if used in place of name on any time, work, or payroll records;
  • social security number;
  • home address;
  • date of birth (if under 18);
  • sex and occupation;
  • time of day and day of week on which the employee’s workweek begins;
  • hours worked each workday and each workweek;
  • regular rate of pay and total straight-time earnings for all hours worked during the workweek;
  • total overtime earnings for the workweek;
  • total additions to or deductions from wages each pay period;
  • the dates, amounts, and nature of each addition and deduction; and
  • total wages paid each pay period and the date of payment.

Notices

Kentucky does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Louisiana

Frequency of Payments

Louisiana does not have a law concerning the frequency or timeliness of payments for most industries. Companies in most industries may establish whatever pay periods and paydays they wish.

However, if you’re in the oil and gas, mining, manufacturing, or public service industries, you must pay your employees at least twice per month on regularly scheduled paydays. If you do not designate paydays, you must pay your employees on the 1st and 16th of each month.

If you’re in the oil and gas, mining, or manufacturing industries, you must pay your employees (excluding clerical and sales staff) within 10 days of the end of the pay period. Companies in the public service industry must pay their employees within 15 days of the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

Louisiana does not have any laws dictating in what manner you may pay your employees.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday or within 15 days, whichever happens sooner.

Deductions

You can only deduct fines from an employee’s paycheck if the employee

  • willfully or negligently damages good or projects,
  • willfully or negligently damages or breaks the employer’s property, or
  • is convicted or pleads guilty to theft of the employer’s funds.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Louisiana does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

However, if an employee makes at least $1 per hour more than the federal minimum wage, you can require the employee to sign a contract agreeing to repay you for the cost of any pre-employment exams, if the employee quits within 90 working days of their first day of work.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you make any changes to the wages an employee will be paid, the method in which they will be paid, and/or the frequency in which they will be paid, you must inform them before the changes go into effect.

Paystubs

Louisiana does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least one (1) year:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • daily and weekly hours worked; and
  • wages paid each pay period.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must inform them of their wage rate, the method in which they will be paid, and how frequently they will be paid.

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Maine

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at regular intervals, which cannot be more than 16 days apart. You must notify your employees at least 30 days before increasing the interval between paydays.

You must pay your employees within eight (8) days after the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check.

If the employee can make an initial withdrawal of the full amount (at no additional cost to the employee) or can choose another method of payment, you can pay your employees via direct deposit, ATM card, or other means of electronic transfer.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regular payday or within two (2) weeks of the employee’s demand for payment, whichever comes first.

Deductions

You can only make deductions from an employee’s paycheck for the following reasons:

  • payment of a loan, debt, or advance made to the employee;
  • payment of any merchandise voluntarily purchased by the employee;
  • for sick or accident benefits or life or group insurance premiums (excluding compensation insurance) that the employee has agreed to pay; or
  • rent, light, or water expenses of a company-owned house or building.

You cannot deduct any of the following from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages,
  • inventory shortages,
  • dishonored checks or credit cards,
  • damages to the employer’s property, or
  • any merchandise purchased by a customer.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You cannot require an employee to pay for uniforms, clothing, tools, equipment, or other necessary items.

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cleaning or maintenance of a uniform, but you can have them sign an agreement to have the cost of cleaning or maintenance deducted from their paycheck.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Maine does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you’re going to reduce an employee’s wages, you must give the employee at least one (1) working day’s notice.

Paystubs

Maine does not have any laws about whether you must give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records:

  • the date and amount paid each pay period, and
  • time worked each day.

Notices

If you increase the interval between paydays, you must give your employees at least 30 days notice.

If an employee requests, you must give them, in writing, the reason for their termination. You must provide the reason within 15 days of the request.

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Maryland

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least twice per month on regularly scheduled paydays. You may pay administrative, executive, and professional employees less frequently.

If the regularly scheduled payday falls on a nonwork day, you must pay your employees on the preceding workday.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If an employee consents, you may pay them via direct deposit.

You may pay your employees through a debit card or card account from which the employee can access funds through withdrawal, purchase or transfer if

  • the employee consents to it and
  • any fees are disclosed to the employee in writing in at least 12-point font.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • ordered by a court of competent jurisdiction;
  • authorized expressly by the employee, in writing;
  • allowed by the Maryland DOL; or
  • required by any law, rule, or regulation issued by local, state, or federal government.

You can only deduct the following with written consent from the employee:

  • cash shortages,
  • inventory shortages,
  • dishonored checks and credit cards,
  • damages to the employer’s property, or
  • any merchandise purchased by a customer.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You may require an employee to buy a required uniform or required tools, but you cannot deduct the cost from the employee’s paycheck without written consent.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Maryland does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire medical, physical, or drug tests.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify an employee at least one (1) pay period in advance before changing their payday or wages.

Paystubs

For each pay period, you must give each employee a paystub. The paystub must include the employee’s gross earnings and any deductions from those earnings.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • rate of pay;
  • amount paid each pay period; and
  • hours worked each day and workweek.

Notices

When you hire a new employee, you must notify them of

  • their rate of pay,
  • regular paydays, and
  • leave benefits.

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Massachusetts

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees weekly or every two (2) weeks.

If your employees work five (5) or six (6) days in a week, you must pay them within six (6) days of the end of the pay period. If your employees work seven (7) days in a week, you must pay them within seven (7) days of the end of the pay period. If your employees work fewer than five (5) days in a week, then you must pay them within seven (7) days of the end of the pay period.

You may pay employees hired in an executive, administrative, or professional capacity (as defined by the attorney general) weekly, biweekly, or semimonthly. However, the employee can choose to be paid monthly.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash your check.

Massachusetts law does not specifically mention whether you can pay your employees via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay the employee on the day of the discharge.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay the employee by the next regularly scheduled payday. If you do not have a regularly scheduled payday, then you must pay the employee on the next Saturday.

Deductions

Based on precedent set by the ruling in Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Case Camara v. Attorney General (2011), you cannot make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages;
  • inventory shortages;
  • dishonored checks or credit cards;
  • damages to the employer’s property; or
  • damage to any merchandise purchased by a customer.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Massachusetts does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

However, you cannot require an employee to put down a deposit for a required uniform, unless approved by the Massachusetts DOL.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You must reimburse the employee or applicant for the medical expenses if you request or require the employee or applicant to receive a medical examination by a physician of your choosing.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub. The paystub must include all deductions taken from the employee’s wages, including:

  • social security,
  • unemployment compensation benefits,
  • pension,
  • vacation or health and welfare funds,
  • state taxes,
  • federal taxes,
  • dues check-off, and
  • contributions to credit unions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least two (2) years:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • amount paid each pay period; and
  • hours worked each day and each week.

Notices

On an employee’s first payday, you must notify them, in writing, of the nature of any deduction or contribution.

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Michigan

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least monthly. You must designate regular paydays.

If you pay your employees semimonthly, you must pay them the wages earned during the first 15 days of the month on or before the first day of the following month. You must pay your employees for wages earned between the 16th and the last day of the month on or before the 15th of the following month.

If you pay your employees weekly or biweekly, you must pay them within 14 days after the end of the pay period.

If you pay your employees monthly, you must pay them on or before the first day of the month following the month in which the wages were earned.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, stored-value debit card, payroll card, or paycard.

With written consent, you may pay your employees via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday. However, if the employee was involved in hand harvesting, then you must pay them within one (1) working day.

Deductions

You may only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required or permitted to do so by law,
  • required or permitted to do by a collective bargaining agreement, or
  • the employee has consented in writing.

You may make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck, if you have written consent each time:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • required uniforms;
  • required tools; or
  • other necessary items.

You can deduct an overpayment from an employee’s paycheck without written consent, if

  • the overpayment was caused by a mathematical miscalculation, typographical error, clerical error, or misprint while processing the employee’s regular paycheck or fringe benefits;
  • the miscalculation, error, or misprint was made by the employer, employee, or a representative of the employer or employee;
  • you provide the employee with a written explanation of the deduction at least one (1) pay period in advance;
  • the deduction occurs within six (6) months of the overpayment;
  • the deduction is 15% or less of the employee’s gross wages earned in the pay period when the deduction will be made;
  • the deduction is made after all required deductions and employee-authorized deductions have been made; and
  • the deduction does not reduce the employee’s gross wages to a rate that is less than the state or federal minimum wage (whichever is greater).

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Michigan does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Michigan does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must inform employees of a wage reduction before the reduction takes effect.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must give each employee a paystub. The paystub must include the following:

  • hours worked,
  • gross wages paid,
  • the pay period for which the payment is being made, and
  • an itemization of deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, birthdate, occupation;
  • total basic rate of pay;
  • total hours worked each pay period;
  • total wages paid each pay period; and
  • an itemization of deductions and fringe benefits.

Notices

Michigan does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Minnesota

Frequency of Payments

You must pay employees at least once a month on regularly scheduled paydays.

If you have any employees who work on a project of a transitory nature (construction; paving, repair, or maintenance of a highway, sewers, or ditches; clearing land; or any other work that requires the employee to move), you must pay your employees at least once every 15 days.

If you’re a public service corporation, you must pay your employees at least twice per month. Payday must be within 15 days after the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If an employee has not objected (in writing), then you may pay them via direct deposit.

If an employee agrees in writing, you can pay them via payroll card.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them within 24 hours of their demand for payment. If the employee was responsible for the collection, disbursement, or handling of money, then you can take 10 calendar days to audit their accounts before paying them.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay your employees by the next regularly scheduled payday. If the regularly scheduled payday is less than five (5) days from the time the employee quits, then you can pay them on the second regularly scheduled payday or within 20 days, whichever is sooner. If the employee was responsible for the collection, disbursement, or handling of money, then you can take 10 calendar days to audit their accounts before paying them.

If a transitory employee leaves the company for any reason, you must pay them within 24 hours.

Deductions

You cannot make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck (unless the employee has voluntarily consented after the event occurred or the employee has been held liable in court for the loss):

  • cash shortages,
  • lost or stolen property,
  • damage to property, or
  • any other claimed indebtedness.

If the employee consents, then you may make the following deductions from their paycheck:

  • union dues;
  • premiums on life insurance;
  • hospitalization and surgical insurance;
  • group accident and health insurance;
  • group term life insurance;
  • group annuities or contributions to credit unions or a community chest fund, local arts council, local science council, Minnesota benefit association, or a federal or state registered political action committee; or
  • participation in any employee stock purchase plan or savings plan for periods longer than 60 days.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You can deduct uniforms or necessary equipment from an employee’s paycheck. This includes:

  • purchased or rented uniform required by you, the nature of employment, or by statute, is not generally appropriate for use outside of work, and does not exceed $50;
  • purchased or rented equipment that may be used outside of work and does not exceed $50;
  • consumable, required supplies; and
  • travel expenses, except expenses incurred by traveling to and from the employee’s home to work.

You must reimburse the employee for any of the above items when the employee leaves your company. You may require the employee to return the uniform, equipment, or other necessary items.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams, except for:

  • certificates of attending physicians related to the administration of an employee’s pension and/or disability plan; or
  • citizenship papers or birth records.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

With each paycheck, you must provide a paystub in writing or electronically. The paystub must include the following:

  • name of the employee,
  • hourly rate of pay,
  • total hours worked,
  • total gross pay,
  • a list of deductions,
  • net pay,
  • the pay period ending date, and
  • the employer’s legal name and operating name.

If you provide your employees with an electronic paystub, you must also allow them access to a company-owned computer during regular working hours to view and print the paystub.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, social security number, and occupation;
  • rate of pay, deductions, and the amount paid each pay period;
  • beginning and ending hours worked each day;
  • total hours worked each day and workweek;
  • a record of free meals accepted;
  • proof of minor’s age (birth certificate, driver’s license, or school-issued age certificate); and
  • Form I-9.

If you hire any migrant workers, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name,
  • daily hours worked,
  • rate of pay, and
  • wages paid each pay period.

Notices

Minnesota does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Mississippi

Frequency of Payments

Mississippi does not have laws dictating how often to pay your employees, for most employers.

If your company is engaged in manufacturing and has 50 or more employees, or if you’re a public labor or public service corporation, then you must pay your employees

  • at least biweekly or semimonthly, or
  • on the second and fourth Saturday of every month.

Manufacturing and public labor companies must pay their employees within 10 days of the end of the pay period. Public service corporations must pay their employees within 15 days of the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

Mississippi does not have any laws dictating in what manner to pay your employees.

Payment Upon Separation

Mississippi does not have any laws about when you have to pay an employee after they have left your company.

Deductions

Mississippi does not have any laws about what can and cannot be deducted from an employee’s paycheck.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Mississippi does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Mississippi does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Mississippi does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

Mississippi does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

Mississippi does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Missouri

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least semimonthly. You must pay your employees within 16 days of the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. There is no law dictating whether you can pay your employees via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them on the day of the discharge.

Deductions

Missouri does not have any laws about what can and cannot be deducted from an employee’s paycheck.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Missouri does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Missouri does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you plan on reducing an employee’s wages, you must give them at least 30-days’ notice, either in writing or by posting a notice in a conspicuous location.

Paystubs</h3
You must give each employee a statement showing the total amount of deductions at least once per month.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

    • name, address, and occupation;
    • rate of pay;
  • amount paid each pay period;
  • hours worked each day and each workweek; and
  • any goods or services provided by the employer in place of wages.

Notices

Missouri does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Didn’t see your state? Go to Part 2.