Do you know your state's payroll laws - Montana-Wyoming

Do You Know Your State’s Payroll Rules? Part 2: Montana  – Wyoming

Disclaimer: I am not an attorney. If you have any questions about federal or state payroll laws, please contact an HR professional and/or Employment Attorney.

Following payroll laws requires more than just making sure your employees are paid on time. Each state has their own payroll laws, including:

Keep reading to find out what your state’s payroll laws are. If your state isn’t listed below, then go to Part 1: Alabama – Missouri.


I won’t make you scroll through this whole thing. Just click on your state below!
| Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey |
| New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio |
|Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina |
| South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont |
| Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming |
Don’t see your state? Go to Part 1: Alabama – Missouri


Montana

Frequency of Payments

Montana does not have any laws dictating how often to pay your employees. However, you must pay your employees within 10 days after the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If you have written or electronic consent (and keep the electronic consent), then you may pay an employee via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them immediately.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them by the next regular payday or within 15 days, whichever is sooner.

Deductions

You cannot make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages,
  • lost or stolen property,
  • damage to property, or
  • any other claimed indebtedness to the employer.

If you discharge an employee due to an allegation of theft of your property connected to the employee’s work, you may withhold a sufficient amount to cover the value of the theft from the employee’s final paycheck if

  • the employee consents in writing, or
  • you file a report of the theft with local law enforcement within seven (7) days of the discharge.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Montana does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee or applicant to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If an employee requests so in writing, you must notify them of their rate of pay before they begin the work. The notification must be in writing or be posted in a conspicuous place.

Paystubs

For each employee, you must provide them with an itemized statement of all deductions and withholdings on each payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • full name and any identifying symbol or number used in place of name on any time, work, or payroll records;
  • home address;
  • date of birth;
  • sex and occupation;
  • time of day and day of week on which the employee’s workweek begins;
  • regular hourly rate of pay and length of pay period;
  • hours worked each workday and total hours worked each workweek;
  • total daily or weekly straight-time earnings;
  • total weekly overtime compensation;
  • total additions to or deductions from wages paid each pay period;
  • a record of dates, amounts, and nature of any additions to or deductions from wages paid each pay period;
  • total wages paid each pay period; and
  • date of each payday and the pay period covered each payday.

Notices

If an employee requests so in writing, you must notify them, before they begin working of their rate of wages (whether hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, or annually) and the date of paydays. The notification must be in writing or be posted in a conspicuous place.

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Nebraska

Frequency & Manner of Payments

You must establish regular paydays, and you must give your employees 30 days’ notice of any change to the payday.

Nebraska does not have any laws dictating how often to pay your employees, or in what manner to pay them.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them all wages due (except commission) on the next regularly scheduled payday or within two (2) weeks, whichever is sooner.

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them any commission due by the next regularly scheduled payday after receiving payment for the goods or services from which the commission was earned.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • permitted to do so by state or federal law,
  • required to do so, or
  • the employee has given written consent.

You can only make the following deductions with written consent from the employee:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • required uniforms;
  • required tools; or
  • any other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Nebraska does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee or applicant to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Nebraska does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least four (4) years:

  • name;
  • social security number;
  • address;
  • nature of work and place(s) in which work is performed;
  • date on which the worker was hired, rehired, or returned to work after a temporary layoff;
  • date the employee left your company and the reasons for leaving; and
  • the total amount paid, including (listed separately):
    • total cash paid,
    • reasonable cash value of any payments made in anything other than cash, and
    • amounts paid as an allowance or reimbursement for traveling or other business expenses.

You also must keep the following records for at least four (4) years:

  • the beginning and end dates of each pay period;
  • total amount paid in each calendar year; and
  • date in each calendar week which had the largest number of workers employed and the number of workers.

Notices

You must give your employees 30 days’ notice of any change in payday.

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Nevada

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees semimonthly. You must establish and maintain regular paydays.

You must pay all wages earned between the 1st and 15th of the month by 8AM on the last day of the same month. You must pay all wages earned between the 16th and the last day of the month by 8AM on the 15th of the month following the month in which the wages were earned.

If an employee is absent on payday, you must pay them within five (5) days of the employee’s demand for payment.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or any other method that the employee agrees to.

You may use an electronic payment system (including direct deposit or payroll card) if:

  • the employee can obtain immediate payment in full;
  • the employee receives at least one free transaction per pay period;
  • any fees or other charges are disclosed to the employee, who consents to them in writing;
  • the location of the payment is easily and readily accessible;
  • there are no other requirements or restrictions that a reasonable person would find unreasonable; and
  • the use of the electronic payment system is optional.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them all wages due immediately.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them on the next regularly scheduled payday or within seven (7) days after they resign or quit, whichever is sooner.

If the employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay them on the next regularly scheduled payday or within seven (7) days after they resign, whichever is earlier.

Deductions

You may only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required or permitted by state or federal law,
  • the deduction is a contribution to a benefits program (such as health insurance or pension plan), or
  • you have written consent from the employee.

You may only make other deductions from an employee’s paycheck if

  • you have a reasonable basis to believe the employee is responsible for the amount being deducted, including
    • cash shortages;
    • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
    • required uniforms;
    • required tools; and
    • other items necessary for employment; or
  • the deduction is for a specific purpose, pay period, and amount.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You cannot require an employee to purchase required uniforms or equipment.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Nevada does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must give your employees at least seven (7) days written notice before reducing their wage rate.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must give each employee an itemized list of deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least two (2) years:

  • gross wages or salary, other than compensation in the form of services, food, housing, or clothing;
  • deductions;
  • net cash wages or salary;
  • total hours worked per day in each pay period; and
  • date of each payment.

Notices

You must keep posted notices in at least two (2) conspicuous places information about

  • the dates of regular paydays and
  • the place of payment.

You must give your employees at least seven (7) days written notice before making any changes to payday or place of payment.

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New Hampshire

Frequency of Payments

Unless other authorized by the New Hampshire DOL, you must pay your employees weekly and within eight (8) days after the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or electronic fund transfer. With written consent, you pay your employees via direct deposit.

You may pay your employees by payroll card if

  • you provide at least one free way to withdraw up to the full amount of the employee’s balance on the card during each pay period, and
  • none of the employer’s costs of the card are passed on to the employee.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay the employee within 72 hours of the discharge.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily and gives you at least one pay period’s notice, you must pay the employee within 72 hours. If they did not give you at least one pay period’s notice, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If the employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if:

  • permitted to do so by state or federal law;
  • the employee has consented, in writing, to the following:
    • union dues;
    • health, welfare, pension, and apprenticeship fund contributions;
    • voluntary contributions to charities;
    • housing and utilities;
    • payments into savings funds held by someone other than the company;
    • voluntary rental fees for non-required clothing;
    • voluntary cleaning of clothing;
    • the employee’s use of a vehicle;
    • medical, surgical, hospital, and other group insurance benefits, without financial advantage to the employer; or
    • required clothing not covered by the definition of a uniform;
  • the deductions are for medical, surgical, or hospital care or service, without financial benefit to the employer and clearly recorded in the employer’s book;
  • the employee consented in writing to one of the following deductions and you provided a written itemized list of the deductions at least once per month:
    • voluntary contributions into cafeteria plans or flexible benefit plans;
    • voluntary payments for:
      • child care fees by a licensed child care provider;
      • parking fees; or
      • pharmaceutical items, gift shop, and cafeteria items purchased at a hospital by hospital employees;
    • voluntary installment payments of legitimate loans made by the employer to the employee;
    • voluntary payments for the recovery of accidental overpayment of wages if
      • the recovery was agreed to in writing;
      • the deduction begins on a pay period following the date the recovery was agreed to in writing; and
      • the written agreement includes:
        • the date the recovery will begin and end;
        • the amount deducted (no more than 20% of the employee’s gross pay in a pay period); and
        • whether the employer can deduct any outstanding amount from the final paycheck if the employee leaves the company;
      • voluntary payments for the recovery of tuition for non-required educational costs; and
      • voluntary payments for the employee’s use of a health or fitness facility that
        • is sponsored by the employer and located within the employer’s facility; or
        • operated by a private health and fitness facility that offers discounted memberships of 50% or more to all employees.

You cannot deduct the following for an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • dishonored or returned checks; or
  • required uniforms.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You cannot require an employee to purchase required uniforms. A uniform is clothing with a logo or distinctive design. You can, however, deduct the cost of required clothing that is not considered a uniform from an employee’s paycheck.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify your employees, in writing, before changing their wage rate.

Paystubs

At least once per month, you must give each employee an itemized list of deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least four (4) years:

  • hours worked,
  • wages paid, and
  • the employee’s classification.

You must:

  • record payroll information so time records support individual pay sheets and that those pay sheets support cancelled checks or cash receipts;
  • require any altered time entries be signed or initialed by the employee;
  • not use an automated timeclock that can be altered by the employer without the employee’s knowledge or that does not clearly indicate that a change was made to the record;
  • keep records showing the exact basis of an employee’s compensation;
  • make available any records to show a relationship other than employer-employee (like an independent contractor); and
  • maintain a signed copy of the written notice given to each employee regarding their
    • rate of pay,
    • frequency of pay,
    • day and place of payment,
    • specific method used to determine wages due, and
    • any policies about fringe benefits.

Notices

When you hire an employee or make a change, you must notify the employee of their

  • rate of pay and salary,
  • frequency of pay,
  • day and place of payment, and
  • the specific method used to determine wages due.

You must also provide employees with a written notice or posted notice detailing employment practices and policies regarding

  • paid vacations,
  • holidays,
  • sick leave,
  • bonuses,
  • severance pay,
  • personal days,
  • payment of employees’ expenses,
  • pension, and
  • other fringe benefits.

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New Jersey

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least twice per month on regularly scheduled paydays. You must pay them within 10 days after the end of the pay period.

If the regularly scheduled payday falls on a nonwork day, then you must pay your employees on the preceding workday.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. You pay your employees via direct deposit with their written consent.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves the company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

If an employee is suspended due to a labor dispute (like a strike), which involved the employees who process payroll, you may have an additional 10 days to pay your employees.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if:

  • required or empowered to do so by state or federal law;
  • the amounts withheld are for
    • contributions authorized in writing or by a collective bargaining agreement to employee welfare, insurance, hospitalization, medical, surgical, pension, retirement, and profit-sharing plans;
    • contributions authorized in writing or by a collective bargaining agreement for payment into a company-operated thrift plan, or security option or security plan to buy securities of the employing company, affiliated company, or other company at market price or less;
    • payments authorized by the employee into the employee’s personal savings accounts;
    • payments for company products, employer loans, safety equipment, government bonds, and to correct payroll errors;
    • contributions authorized by the employee for organized and recognized charities;
    • payment authorized by the employee or by a collective bargaining agreement for the rental of work clothing or the laundering and dry cleaning of that work clothing;
    • labor organization dues and initiation fees;
    • contributions authorized in writing by the employee or by a collective bargaining agreement to a political committee or continuing political committee established by the labor union for making contributions to aid or promote nomination, election, or defeat of any candidate for a public office of the state, county, municipality, or school district or for the defeat of any public question;
    • contributions authorized in writing by an employee to any political committee or continuing political committee; or
    • payments authorized by the employee for employer-sponsored programs for the purchase of insurance or annuities on a group or individual basis.

You cannot deduct the following from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • the cost of required uniforms or clothing;
  • required tools; or
  • other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

If a uniform cannot be worn outside of work, then you cannot require an employee to pay for it.

If you require the employee to wear specific clothing that is acceptable outside of work and require the employee to furnish more than one style, type or color of clothing during any one (1) year of employment, you must pay each employee the amount the employee is required to pay for the newly required clothing. You must make the payment in the week the change is required.

If you hire kitchen people, cooks, and dishwashers, you must pay for and provide maintenance and cleaning of their uniforms.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you plan on reducing an employee’s wage rate, you must notify them before the reduction.

Paystubs

New Jersey does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least six (6) years:

  • name and address
  • birthdate (if under 18),
  • total hours worked each day and each workweek,
  • earnings (including regular hourly wage),
  • gross to net amounts paid with itemized deductions, and
  • the basis on which wages are paid.

Notices

New Jersey does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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New Mexico

Frequency of Payments

You must designate regular paydays, which are no more than 16 days apart.

You must pay employees wages earned from the 1st to the 15th of the month by the 25th of the month. You must pay employees wages earned from the 16th to the last day of the month by the 10th day of the following month.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason and their wages are a fixed amount, you must pay them within five (5) days of the discharge. If their wages are based on task, piece, commission, or other method of calculation, then you must pay them within 10 days of the discharge.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay the employee by the next regularly scheduled payday.

If the employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required or permitted to do so by state or federal law or court order, or
  • the employee has consented in writing.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

New Mexico does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

New Mexico does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you plan on reducing an employee’s wage rate, you must notify them before the reduction.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub, which must include:

  • employer’s name,
  • employee’s gross pay,
  • number of hours worked,
  • total wages and benefits earned, and
  • an itemized list of all deductions withheld.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep an accurate record of hours worked and wages paid for at least one (1) year.

Notices

New Mexico does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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New York

Frequency of Payments

You must pay manual workers weekly. Payday must be no more than seven (7) days after the end of the pay period.

You must pay railroad workers on or before Thursday of each week the wages were earned during a seven (7) day period, ending on the Tuesday of the preceding week.

You must pay commissioned salespeople at least once per month and no later than the last day of the month following the month in which the wages were earned.

You must pay clerical and other workers at least semimonthly on regularly scheduled paydays.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. With an employee’s consent, you may pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday. You must notify the employee about the termination at least five (5) days in advance and tell them the ending date of any employee benefits.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction if

  • permitted by state or federal law;
  • the employee has consented in writing and the deduction is for:
    • insurance premiums;
    • prepaid legal plans;
    • pension or health and welfare benefits;
    • contributions to charitable organizations;
    • purchases made at an event sponsored by a charitable organization affiliated with the employer, where at least 20% of profits go to the charitable organization;
    • S. bonds, union dues or assessments;
    • discounts for parking, tokens, fare cards, vouchers, or other items allowing the employee to use mass transit;
    • fitness center, health club, or gym dues;
    • cafeteria or vending machine purchases or purchases made at employer-operated gift shops, if the employee works at a hospital, college, or university;
    • pharmacy purchases made at the employer’s place of business;
    • tuition, room, board, and fees for pre-school, nursery, primary, secondary, or post-secondary educational institutions;
    • day care and before and after-school care expenses;
    • payments for housing, if the employee works at a non-profit hospital or affiliate;
    • similar benefits that do not exceed 10% of the employee’s total gross pay for a pay period;
  • the deduction is for an overpayment of wages due to a mathematical or clerical error; or
  • the deduction is for a repayment of salary advances.

A collective bargaining agreement may serve as an employee’s written consent.

An employee can revoke their written consent at any time, and you must stop the deduction as soon as possible, no more than four (4) pay periods or eight (8) weeks after the revocation, whichever is sooner.

You must notify an employee as soon as practical before any substantial changes to their deductions are made.

You cannot make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages,
  • inventory shortages,
  • loss of or damage to employer’s property,
  • required uniforms, or
  • required tools and other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

New York does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

New York does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify an employee of a change to their wage rate at least seven (7) days before the new wage rate takes effect.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub, which must include the following:

  • dates covered by the paycheck;
  • name of employee;
  • name of employer;
  • employer’s address and phone number;
  • rate(s) of pay and basis of pay (hour, shift, daily, salary, commission, etc.);
  • gross wages earned;
  • deductions taken;
  • allowances taken (tips, meal, lodging, etc.);
  • net wages earned;
  • regular hourly rate(s) of pay;
  • overtime rate of pay;
  • number of regular hours worked;
  • number of overtime hours worked;
  • applicable piece rate(s) of pay;
  • number of pieces completed at each piece rate; and
  • the employee’s accrued total earning, taxes to date, and a listing of daily wages and how they were computed, if the employer is a railroad corporation.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least six (6) years:

  • hours worked each week;
  • rate(s) of pay and basis of pay (hour, shift, daily, salary, commission, etc.);
  • net wages;
  • regular hourly rate(s) of pay;
  • overtime rate(s) of pay;
  • number of regular hours worked;
  • written acknowledgement that the employee received an initial notice concerning their employment; and
  • number of overtime hours worked.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must provide a written notice of:

  • their rate of pay;
  • their overtime rate of pay;
  • the basis on which they are paid (hour, shift, daily, salary, commission, etc.);
  • any allowances you intend to claim as part of the minimum wage (tips, meals, lodging, etc.);
  • regular payday;
  • employer’s name and DBA;
  • physical address of the employer’s main office or principal place of business;
  • employer’s mailing address; and
  • employer’s telephone number.

If the employee’s primary language is not English, you must provide the notice in English and their primary language.

Each employee must give written acknowledgment, signed and dated, stating that they received the notice. You must provide a copy of the acknowledgement to the employee.

You must inform your employees of any changes in the terms and conditions of their employment at least seven (7) days in advance.

You must notify your employees in writing or by public posting of your policies on sick leave, vacation leave, personal leave, and holiday leave and hours.

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North Carolina

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees on regularly scheduled paydays either daily, weekly, biweekly, semimonthly, or monthly.

Bonuses, commissions, or similar wages may be paid as infrequently as once per year, if you notify the employee in advance.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, money order, direct deposit, or any legal form of payment.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • permitted by state or federal law;
  • both the employer and employee are aware of the amount and have agreed to it, and if the employee has given prior written consent, which
    • is signed on or before the payday from which the deduction is to be made;
    • indicates the reason for the deduction; and
    • states the dollar amount or percentage that will be deducted;
  • the employee does not know the amount of the deduction and has not agreed to it in advance, you must
    • obtain written authorization, which is signed on or before the payday from which the deduction is to be made and indicates the reasons for the deduction; and
    • give written notice of the actual amount deducted and the employee’s right to withdraw consent.

If an employee gives written consent at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the deduction, you may deduct the following:

  • cash shortages,
  • inventory shortages, or
  • loss or damage to property.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

North Carolina does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

North Carolina does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you plan on reducing an employee’s wages, you must give them 24-hours advance notice.

Paystubs

Each pay period, you must give each employee an itemized list of their deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • full name,
  • home address,
  • birthdate (if under 20),
  • occupation or job title,
  • time of day and day of week the employee’s workweek begins,
  • regular rate of pay,
  • total hours worked each day and each workweek,
  • total straight-time pay each workweek,
  • total overtime pay each workweek,
  • total additions to and deductions from each paycheck,
  • total gross wages each paycheck,
  • date of each payday,
  • tip credits,
  • costs of meals,
  • costs of lodging or other facilities,
  • start and end time (if under 18),
  • youth employment certificates,
  • vacation and sick leave policies,
  • policies and procedures relating to promised wages, and
  • any other records related to wages or time worked.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must notify them orally or in writing of their promised wage rate and the day and place of each payday.

You also must notify all employees, in writing or through a posted notice, of your employment practices and policies regarding promised wages.

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North Dakota

Frequency & Manner of Payments

You must pay your employees at least monthly on a designated payday.

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit. If your employee agrees to it, you may pay them via payroll card. The card must be insured by a federally insured bank or credit union, and you must deposit enough into the card account to cover the employee’s wages and any fees associated with the card.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You may only make deductions from an employee’s paycheck if

  • permitted by state or federal law, or
  • the employee has agreed to the deduction in writing.

You cannot deduct the following without the employee’s written consent:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • required uniforms;
  • required tools; or
  • other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You can require an employee to purchase a required uniform.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub. The stub must include:

  • rate of pay,
  • hours worked, and
  • all deductions made.

Recordkeeping

North Dakota does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

North Dakota does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Ohio

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least semimonthly.

If you pay your employees twice a month, you must pay them any wages earned during the first half of the preceding month by the first day of the month. You must pay all wages earned during the second half of the preceding month by the 15th of the month.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. Ohio does not have any laws forbidding you from paying your employees via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

Ohio does not have any laws about when you have to pay an employee after they have left your company.

Deductions

You may deduct the following from any employee’s paycheck:

  • S. savings bonds,
  • corporate stocks or bonds,
  • charitable contributions,
  • credit union savings or other savings programs, or
  • repayment of a loan or other obligation.

You can only deduct the cost of damage or loss of products, tools, or machinery destroyed or damaged by the employee with the employee’s written consent.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Ohio does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Ohio does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • rate of pay and amount paid each pay period, and
  • hours worked each day and each workweek.

Notices

Ohio does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Oklahoma

Frequency & Manner of Payments

You must pay your employees at least twice per month on regularly scheduled paydays. You must pay your employees within 11 days after the end of the pay period.

You may pay your employees by cash, check, payroll card, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if:

  • permitted by state or federal law, or
  • the employee has given written consent for the following deductions:
    • repayment of a loan or advance;
    • repayment of a payroll overpayment;
    • cost of merchandise purchased by the employee;
    • uniforms;
    • insurance premiums;
    • retirement or other investment plans; or
    • for breakage or loss of merchandise, inventory shortage, or cash shortage if the employee was the only person responsible for the breakage, loss, or shortage.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You can require an employee to purchase a required uniform.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Oklahoma does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire medical, physical, or drug tests.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must provide each employee with a list of deductions made.

Recordkeeping

You must keep the following records for at least five (5) years:

  • a list of employees; and
  • wages, hours, and other employment conditions and practices.

Notices

Oklahoma does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Oregon

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least once every 35 days on scheduled paydays.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check.

You may pay your employees via direct deposit or payroll card if the employee

  • consents,
  • can make an initial withdraw of their entire net wages without any costs or fees, and
  • can choose another means of payment.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them by the end of the first business day after their separation date.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily and gives you at least 48-hours’ notice (not including weekends or holidays), you must pay them on the last day of their employment.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily and is required to submit time records, then you must pay them within five (5) days after quitting.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily without notice, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday or within 30 days, whichever is sooner.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required by state or federal law;
  • the employee gives written consent for a deduction that is for their benefit and recorded in the employer’s books;
  • the employee voluntarily gives written consent for a deduction, if the recipient of the funds withheld is not the employer;
  • the deduction is authorized by a collective bargaining agreement;
  • the deduction is a garnishment authorized by the State of Oregon; or
  • the employee gives written consent for the deduction to be made from their final paycheck as a repayment of a loan if
    • the employee voluntarily consented,
    • the loan was made for the employee’s benefit,
    • the loan was not for any purpose required by the employer,
    • the deduction is not more than the amount allowed by the State of Oregon, and
    • the deduction is recorded in the employer’s books.

You cannot make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property;
  • dishonored or returned checks;
  • required uniforms;
  • required tools; or
  • other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You can require an employee to purchase a specific uniform. You cannot require an employee to purchase a “general” uniform, which is any clothing acceptable to be worn outside of work.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Oregon does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must give each employee a list of the amounts and purposes of their deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records:

  • full name and identifying symbol or mark, if used in place of the name on any time, work, or payroll records;
  • home address;
  • birthdate (if under 19);
  • occupation;
  • time of day and day of week the employee’s workweek begins;
  • regular hourly rate of pay and the basis of pay (hourly, salary, commission, etc.);
  • the amount and nature of any payment excluded from the regular rate of pay;
  • hours worked each workday and workweek;
  • total daily or straight-time wages earned;
  • total premium pay for overtime worked;
  • total additions to and deductions from an employee’s paycheck;
  • the dates, amounts, and purpose of any additions to or deductions from an employee’s paycheck;
  • total wages paid each pay period;
  • date of each payday and pay period; and
  • a symbol, letter, or other notation placed on pay records of any tipped employees.

If an employee works a fixed schedule, you can keep the following records instead of the hours worked each day and workweek:

  • indicate any week where the employee adhered to the fixed schedule with a checkmark or other method, and
  • the exact number of hours worked each day and workweek when the employee worked more or less than the fixed scheduled hours.

For executive, administrative, professional, or outside sales employees, you must keep the following records:

  • full name and identifying symbol or mark, if used in place of the name on any time, work, or payroll records;
  • home address;
  • birthdate (if under 19);
  • occupation;
  • time of day and day of week the employee’s workweek begins; and
  • basis on which wages are paid and method of calculation.

For employees who work in a hospital or similar institution and are paid for overtime for a work period of 14 consecutive days, you must keep the following records:

  • full name and identifying symbol or mark, if used in place of the name on any time, work, or payroll records;
  • home address;
  • birthdate (if under 19);
  • occupation;
  • regular hourly rate of pay and the basis of pay (hourly, salary, commission, etc.);
  • the amount and nature of any payment excluded from the regular rate of pay;
  • total additions to and deductions from an employee’s paycheck;
  • the dates, amounts, and purpose of any additions to or deductions from an employee’s paycheck;
  • total wages paid each pay period;
  • date of each payday and pay period; and
  • time and day of week when the employee’s 14-day work period begins;
  • hours worked each workday and total hours worked each 14-day period;
  • total straight-time wages paid;
  • total overtime wages paid for hours worked in excess of eight (8) hours in a workday and 80 hours in a work period; and
  • a copy of the agreement explaining the terms of using a 14-day period for overtime pay calculations.

Notices

Oregon does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Pennsylvania

Frequency of Payments

If an employee is not paid on an annual salary, you must pay your employees at least semimonthly and on regularly scheduled paydays.

If you pay your employees semimonthly, you must make the first payment between the 1st and 15th of the month and the second payment between the 16th and the last day of the month.

You must pay all wages earned

  • within the number of days after the pay period ends specified in a written employment contract, or
  • within the standard time customary in the trade or within 15 days after the end of the pay period.

Overtime wages can be paid in the next succeeding pay period after which they were earned.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If the employee consents, you may pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

Any deduction from an employee’s paycheck must be made for the benefit of the employee.

With the employee’s consent, you may make the following deductions from their paychecks:

  • contributions to and recovery of overpayments under employee welfare and pension plans subject to the Federal Welfare and Pension Plans Disclosure Act;
  • contributions authorized in writing or under a collective bargaining agreement to employee welfare and pension plans, including:
    • group insurance plans,
    • hospitalization insurance,
    • life insurance,
    • group hospitalization and medical service programs over by nonprofit hospitalization and medical service organizations, and
    • medical group plans;
  • contributions to overpayments under employee welfare and pension plans not subject to the Federal Welfare and Pension Plans Disclosure Act, with written consent;
  • deductions authorized in writing or under a collective bargaining agreement to the following:
    • company-operated thrift plans, and
    • stock option or stock purchase plans to buy securities of the employing or affiliated company at market price or less;
  • deductions authorized in writing into personal savings accounts;
  • contributions authorized in writing for charitable purposes;
  • contributions authorized in writing for local area development activities;
  • deductions allowed by state and federal law;
  • labor organization dues, assessments, and initiation fees;
  • deductions for repayment to the employer for a loan;
  • deductions for purchases or replacements of goods, products, merchandise, services, facilities, rent, or similar items;
  • deductions for purchases by the employee of goods, products, or merchandise, services, facilities, rent, or similar items from a third-party, which is not owned, affiliated, or controlled (directly or indirectly) by the employer.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Pennsylvania does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams if the employee works for you for at least one workweek. This restriction does not apply if the exam is required by law.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify an employee before changing their wage rate or deductions.

Paystubs

For each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub, which includes:

  • hours worked,
  • rates paid,
  • gross wages,
  • allowances claimed as part of the minimum wage,
  • deductions, and
  • net wages.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • full name and identifying symbol or number, if used in place of name on time, work, or payroll records;
  • home address;
  • regular hourly rate;
  • occupation;
  • time and day that the employee’s workweek begins;
  • number of hours worked each day and workweek;
  • total daily or weekly straight-time wages due each workweek;
  • total overtime excess due each workweek;
  • total additions to and deductions from each paycheck;
  • the dates, amounts, and purposes of each addition to or deduction from each paycheck;
  • allowances claimed as part of the minimum wage;
  • total wages paid each pay period;
  • date of each payday and pay period;
  • special certificates for students and learners; and
  • the basis on which wages are paid, for executive, administrative, or professional employees.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must notify them of

  • time and place of payment;
  • rate of pay; and
  • amount of any fringe benefits or wage supplements to be paid to the employee, a third party, or a fund for the employee’s benefit.

You must notify employees to any changes to time and place of payment, rate of pay, and the amount of fringe benefits or wage supplements.

You must post the aforementioned information in a conspicuous place.

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Rhode Island

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least weekly, unless they are paid a fixed biweekly, semimonthly, monthly, or yearly rate.

You must establish a regular payday and notify employees of any change to the payday at least three (3) paydays in advance.

You must pay employees within nine (9) days after the end of the pay period. If payday falls on a holiday, you may pay your employees on the following day.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If you have the employee’s written consent, you may pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

If you discharge an employee because you’re liquidating, merging, or disposing the business or are moving the business out of state, you must pay the employee within 24 hours of the termination.

Deductions

If you have the employee’s written consent, you can make the following deductions from their paycheck:

  • repayment of loans of advances, if the employee agrees to the amount deducted each pay period;
  • trade union or craft dues or other obligations specified in a collective bargaining contract;
  • subscriptions to a nonprofit hospital, medical, or surgical service corporation;
  • contributions to or for the use of a religious, charitable, scientific, literary, or educational corporation, trust, community chest fund, or foundation;
  • purchasing of US stock or bonds or corporation stock as part of an employee stock purchase plan;
  • contributions to a pension plan;
  • contributions to or for insurance or under an insurance plan for accident, health, or life coverage;
  • credit to a share, deposit, or loan account in any credit union;
  • similar contributions, subscriptions, or payments not connected with past or present indebtedness; or
  • payments for participation in a voluntary van pool transportation system.

You cannot make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages;
  • breakage, damage, or loss of employer’s property;
  • uniforms;
  • tools; or
  • other necessary items.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Rhode Island does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You must pay the cost of any pre-hire exam.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about a wage reduction.

Paystubs

Each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub, which includes:

  • hours worked during the pay period,
  • all deductions made,
  • the purpose or basis of each deduction, and
  • the employee’s hourly regular rate of pay, if you’re engaged in the commercial construction industry.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • rate of pay;
  • amount paid each pay period; and
  • hours worked each day and workweek.

Notices

Rhode Island does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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South Carolina

Frequency & Manner of Payments

South Carolina does not have any laws dictating how often to pay your employees.

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay the employee within 48 hours of the discharge.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • permitted by state or federal law,
  • you have given the employee written notice of the withholding or deduction at time of hire, or
  • you have given the employee at least seven (7) days written notice of the withholding or deduction.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

South Carolina does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

South Carolina does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

If you plan on reducing an employee’s wages, you must give them seven (7) advance notice in writing.

Paystubs

Each payday, you must give each employee a paystub, which includes their gross pay and deductions made.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name and address,
  • wages paid each payday, and
  • deductions made each payday.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must notify them in writing of

  • their normal hours,
  • agreed upon wages,
  • time and place of payment, and
  • deductions that will be made, including payments to insurance programs.

You can satisfy this requirement by posting the notification conspicuously.

You must notify any employee of changes to those terms at least seven (7) days in advance.

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South Dakota

Frequency & Manner of Payments

You must pay your employees at least once a month or on a regular scheduled payday.

You may pay your employees by cash, check, direct deposit, or any agreed upon form of payment.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

South Dakota does not have any laws about what can and cannot be deducted from an employee’s paycheck.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

South Dakota does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

South Dakota does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

South Dakota does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

South Dakota does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Tennessee

Frequency of Payments

All wages earned between the 1st and 15th of the month must be paid by the 5th of the following month. All wages earned between the 16th and the last day of the month must be paid by the 20th of the following month.

You must establish regular paydays and post notices setting those paydays in at least two (2) conspicuous places.

Manner of Payments

You can pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regular payday or within 21 days of leaving, whichever occurs later.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if the employee agreed to it in writing.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Tennessee does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Tennessee does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify an employee before changing their wage rate.

Paystubs

Tennessee does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

Tennessee does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

You must notify an employee of their rate of pay before they perform any work at that rate.

You must post notices setting regular paydays in at least two (2) conspicuous places.

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Texas

Frequency of Payments

You must pay any non-exempt employee at least semimonthly. You must pay exempt employees at least monthly.

If you pay your employees twice per month, each pay period must be as close to the same number of days as possible.

You must designate regular paydays. If you do not designate paydays, your paydays are the 1st and 15th of each month. You must post, in conspicuous places, notices of your paydays.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check.

You may pay your employees via direct deposit if

  • you notify them in writing at least 60 days before the direct deposit payroll system is scheduled to begin, and
  • you get required information from the employee concerning their chosen financial institution.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them within six (6) days of the discharge.

If the employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • ordered by a court of competent jurisdiction,
  • authorized by state or federal law, or
  • the employee has given written consent to the deduction.

An employee’s written consent must be specific to the deduction and must

  • give the employee a reasonable idea of the amount to be withheld, and
  • have a clear indication that the deduction is to be withheld.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Texas does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Texas does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

For each pay period, you must give each employee a paystub, which must include:

  • the employer’s signature,
  • name of the employee,
  • rate of pay,
  • total pay earned during the pay period,
  • any deduction made and the purpose of each deduction,
  • net pay, and
  • total hours worked (if pay is per hour) or total units produced (if pay is per piece).

Recordkeeping

Texas does not have any specific payroll recordkeeping laws.

Notices

You must post, in conspicuous places, notices indicating when your paydays are.

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Utah

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least semimonthly on regularly scheduled paydays, unless the employee has an annual salary.

You must pay your employees within 10 days after the end of the pay period.

You must pay all annual-salaried employees at least once per month. If you pay them once per month, you must pay them by the 7th of the month following the month in which the wages were earned.

If payday falls on a weekend or holiday, you must pay your employees on the preceding day.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them within 24 hours of the discharge.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

If an employee is suspended or resigns due to a labor dispute (like a strike), you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • permitted or required by court order, state law, or federal law;
  • the employee gives written consent;
  • you present evidence that, in the opinion of a hearing officer or administrative law judge, would warrant an offset; or
  • the deduction is for contributions to a contract or plan established by the employer under Section 401(k), 403(b), 408, 408A, or 457 retirement plan.

You may make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • dues, contributions, or other fees to a labor, employee, professional, or other employer-related organization;
  • contributions to a health, welfare, insurance, retirement, or other benefit program;
  • payments, repayments, contributions, and deposits to a credit union, banking, saving, loan, trust, or other financial institution;
  • purchase of goods or services from the employer, if the employee has actual possession of the goods or services and has given written acknowledgement that they made the purchase;
  • payment for damages due to the employee’s negligence;
  • repayment of advances or loans;
  • payment for loss or damage to the employer’s property due to the employee’s criminal conduct;
  • payment for cash shortages;
  • payment for the purchase of goods, tools, equipment, or other items required for employment; and
  • payment for goods, tools, equipment, and other items assigned to the employee.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Utah does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify an employee before changing their rate of pay. You may notify employees by posting the information in a conspicuous place.

Paystubs

On each payday, you must give each employee a statement listing the amount of each deduction.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, and birthdate;
  • hours worked; and
  • wages paid.

For each employee paid on an hourly or daily basis, you must keep the following records for at least one (1) year:

  • an accurate record of time worked, and
  • wages paid each pay period.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must notify them of the day and place of payment and of their rate of pay.

You must notify an employee of any change to their rate of pay or to the day and place of payment. You may notify employees by posting the information in a conspicuous place.

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Vermont

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees weekly. If you have given your employees written notice, you can pay them biweekly or semimonthly.

You must pay wages within six (6) days after the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If you have written consent, you may pay your employees via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them within 72 hours of the discharge.

If an employee quits or resigns voluntarily, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday. If there is no regularly scheduled payday, then you must pay them by the following Friday.

Deductions

You cannot make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • cash shortages; or
  • breakage, damage, or loss of the employer’s property.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You cannot require an employee to purchase a uniform or deduct the cost of the uniform from the employee’s paycheck without the employee’s voluntary consent.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about a wage reduction.

Paystubs

Vermont does not have any laws about whether you have to give each employee a paystub on payday.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records:

  • an accurate record of hours worked, and
  • wages paid.

Notices

Vermont does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Virginia

Frequency of Payments

You must establish regular pay periods.

Hourly employees must be paid at least once every two weeks or twice per month. Salaried employees must be paid at least monthly.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit. If the employee consents, you may pay them by prepaid payroll card.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required or authorized by law, or
  • the employee gives written consent.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Virginia does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify an employee of any change to their rate of pay before the change occurs.

Paystubs

If an employee requests it, you must provide them with a written state of

  • their gross pay earned during any pay period, and
  • the amount and purpose of any deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records:

  • full legal name;
  • social security number;
  • state(s) or country (countries) in which the employee’s work is performed;
  • date of hire, rehire, or return to work;
  • date when work ended and the reason;
  • scheduled hours;
  • wages earned in any week by a part-time employee;
  • time lost and the reason;
  • total wages in each pay period;
  • total wages for each quarter, with separate amounts for cash wages (including tips and severance pay) and the cash value of other payment;
  • any special payments (annual bonuses, gifts, prizes, etc.), showing separately cash payments, cash value of other payments, and the reason for each payment;
  • amounts paid as advancement, allowance, or reimbursement for traveling or other business expenses and the dates and amounts of each payment; and
  • the location in which the work was performed and the dates any service was performed outside the US.

Notices

Virginia does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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Washington

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least once per month on established paydays.

You must pay your employees within 10 days after the end of the pay period.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the end of the established pay period.

Deductions

You may make the following deductions from an employee’s paycheck:

  • required state or federal taxes, including the employee’s share of workers’ compensation premiums;
  • a deduction that is for the employee’s benefit that the employee agreed to in advance;
  • medical, surgical, or hospital care or service when the business pays for the employee’s medical, surgical, or hospital care or service and the employee agrees to the deductions; and
  • court-ordered garnishments.

You may make the following deductions form an employee’s paycheck, if the incident occurred during the employee’s final pay period:

  • cash shortages, if your company has established policies regarding cash acceptance, and if the employee counted money in the till before and after their shift and had sole access to the till during their shift;
  • breakage, loss, or damage of equipment if caused by the employee’s dishonest or willful act;
  • bad checks or credit cards accepted by the employee, if you have established check and credit card acceptance policies;
  • employee theft, if you can show that the employee’s act was dishonest or willful and you filed a police report; and
  • other agreements made orally or in writing.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

If you and your employee agree orally or in writing, you can deduct the cost of employer-supplied uniforms, if the uniforms are not returned when the employee leaves your company.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Washington does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Each payday, you must provide each employee with a paystub, which includes the following:

  • basis for pay (hourly, daily, etc.);
  • rate(s) of pay;
  • gross wages; and
  • all deductions for pay period.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name, address, and occupation;
  • dates of employment;
  • rate(s) of pay;
  • amount paid each pay period; and
  • hours worked.

Notices

Washington does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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West Virginia

Frequency & Manner of Payments

You must pay your employees at least once every two (2) weeks.

You may pay your employees by cash, check, payroll card, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If you discharge an employee for any reason, you must pay them within 72 hours of the discharge.

If the employee quits or resigns voluntarily and gives at least one pay period’s notice, you must pay them immediately. If they do not give at least one pay period’s notice, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if

  • required by law;
  • authorized for union or club dues, pension plans, payroll savings plans, credit unions, charities, and hospitalization and medical insurance; or
  • agreed to by the employee.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

West Virginia does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

West Virginia does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

You must notify an employee in writing or through posted notice before making any changes to their pay rate, or to the day, hour, or place of payment.

Paystubs

Each payday, you must provide each employee with a list of their deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least two (2) years:

  • name and address;
  • rate of pay;
  • hours worked;
  • payroll deductions; and
  • amount paid each pay period.

Notices

You must:

  • notify new employees of their rate of pay, and the day, hour, and place of payment;
  • notify an employee in writing or through posted notice before making any changes to their pay rate, or to the day, hour, or place of payment; and
  • make available, in writing or through posted notice, employment practices and policies regarding vacation pay, sick leave, and comparable matters.

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Wisconsin

Frequency of Payments

You must pay your employees at least monthly. You must pay them within 31 days of the end of the pay period.

If you’re engaged in the logging or farming industry, you may pay your employees quarterly.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash, check, or direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regular payday.

If an employee leaves your company because you’re liquidating, merging, or disposing the business or are moving the business out of state, you must pay the employee within 24 hours of the separation.

Deductions

You can only make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck for defective or faulty workmanship, lost or stolen property, or damage to property if

  • the employee gives their written consent to the deduction;
  • the employer and a representative of the employee (like a union) determine the defective or faulty workmanship, lost or stolen property, or damage to property was due to the employee’s negligence, carelessness, or willful and intentional conduct; or
  • the employee is found guilty or held liable in a court of competent jurisdiction because of negligence, carelessness, or willful and intentional conduct.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

Wisconsin does not have any laws about whether you can require an employee to purchase a uniform or equipment necessary for them to do their job.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

You cannot require an employee to pay for the cost of any pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Each paycheck, you must provide each employee with a paystub printed on the paycheck, included in the pay envelope, or on paper accompanying the wage payment. The paystub must include:

  • number of hours worked,
  • rate of pay, and
  • amount of and reason for each deduction.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least three (3) years:

  • name and address,
  • birthdate,
  • date of entering and leaving employment,
  • when employee’s meal periods are required or when they will be deducted from work time,
  • total hours worked each day and workweek,
  • rate of pay and wages paid each pay period,
  • amount of and reason for each deduction, and
  • output of employee, if they’re paid on a non-time basis.

Notices

When you hire an employee, you must notify them of any hairstyle, facial hair, or clothing requirement.

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Wyoming

Frequency of Payments

Wyoming does not have laws dictating how often to pay your employees for most employers.

If you operate a railroad, mine, refinery, factory, mill, or workshop or engage in the oil and gas industry, then you must pay your employees all wages earned between the 1st and the 15th of the month by the 1st of the following month. You must pay all wages earned between the 16th and the last of the month by the 15th of the following month.

If payday falls on a non-workday, you must pay the employee on the preceding workday.

Manner of Payments

You may pay your employees by cash or check. If you have the employee’s written consent, you may pay them via direct deposit.

Payment Upon Separation

If an employee leaves your company for any reason, you must pay them by the next regularly scheduled payday.

Deductions

You may make a deduction from an employee’s paycheck if it’s deducted

  • for damages due to the employee’s negligence, if
    • the negligence is determined by a judicial proceeding;
    • the amount of the damage is determined by a judicial proceeding;
    • the negligence and damages happen during employment; and
    • the employer has not received payments or compensation from any insurer, assurer, surety, or guaranty for the damages;
  • for cash shortages, if
    • the employee gives acknowledgement, in writing, when they’re hired that they will be responsible for any shortages;
    • the employer and employee verify, in writing, the amount of cash that is in the register at the beginning of the employee’s shift;
    • the employer and employee verify, in writing, the amount of cash that is in the register at the end of the employee’s shift; and
    • the employee was the only one to use and have access to the register during their shift;
  • as payment for the purchase of tools, equipment, uniforms, or other required items, if
    • the employee has actual possession of the items, and
    • there is written acknowledgement that the employee purchased and received the item;
  • as required by state or federal law;
  • as dues, contributions, or other fees to any labor organization or association or as contributions to a health, welfare, insurance, retirement, or other benefit plan, if
    • the employee has given written consent, and
    • the deductions will be stopped if the employee revokes their consent;
  • as payments, repayments, contributions, or deposits to any credit union, banking, savings, loan, trust, or other financial institution, if
    • the employee has given written consent, and
    • the deductions will be stopped if the employee revokes their consent;
  • as payment for the purchase of goods or services from the employer, if
    • the goods or services are sold during the ordinary course of business,
    • the employee has actual possession of the goods or services, and
    • there is written acknowledgement that the employee purchased and received the item;
  • as required by an attachment or garnishment order; or
  • as repayment of any cash advances, loans, or payments of expenses for option benefits (like tuition assistance, relocation, etc.), if
    • the cash advance, loan, or payment of expenses occurred while the employee worked for the employer, and
    • there is written acknowledgement that the employee received the cash advance, loan, or payment of expenses.

Uniforms & Other Required Equipment or Tools

You can require an employee to pay for required uniforms, tools, equipment, or other necessary items.

Pre-Hire Medical, Physical, & Drug Tests

Wyoming does not have any laws about whether you can require employees to pay for pre-hire exams.

Notice of Wage Reduction

There are no laws dictating whether you have to notify an employee about the wage reduction.

Paystubs

Each payday, you must give each employee an itemized list of their deductions.

Recordkeeping

For each employee, you must keep the following records for at least two (2) years:

  • name, address, occupation;
  • rate of pay;
  • amount paid each pay period; and
  • hours worked each day and workweek.

Notices

Wyoming does not require you to post payroll-related notices.

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